#2 in a series of Jan Zlotnick posts based on a study by The McKinsey Global Institute (MGI), the business and economics research arm of McKinsey & Company, not commissioned by any business, government, or other institution.


There’s a powerful engine purring inside most businesses, waiting for someone in charge to step on the gas. While the McKinsey study shows that “…the most powerful applications of social technologies…are largely untapped,” CMOs can impress upon their CEOs, CFOs, and CIOs to look under their own hoods to boost internal productivity gains…via social media. The McKinsey Global Institute (MGI) finds that “twice as much potential value lies in using social tools to enhance communications, knowledge sharing, and collaboration within and across enterprises. and estimates that by fully implementing social technologies, companies can raise the productivity of its high-skill knowledge workers, including managers and professionals, by 20% to 25%.

Of the $900 billion to $1.3 trillion in annual value across the four commercial sectors (consumer packaged goods, retail financial services, advanced manufacturing, and professional services), 66% of this potential value lies in “improving collaboration and communication within and across enterprises.”

Example: The average interaction worker spends an estimated 28% of the work week managing e-mail and nearly 20% looking for internal information or tracking down colleagues who can help with specific tasks.

But when companies use social media internally, messages become content. And a searchable record of knowledge can reduce, by as much as 35%, the time employees spend searching for company information.

#2 in a series of Jan Zlotnick posts based on a study by The McKinsey Global Institute (MGI), the business and economics research arm of McKinsey & Company, not commissioned by any business, government, or other institution.

Latest Update: Jun 05, 2016